A day in the life of a jellyfish hunter (2022)

A day in the life of a jellyfish hunter

  • ByNancy Bazilchuk
    Published11.10.18

The oceans are teeming with ever-increasing numbers of jellyfish. These squishy sea creatures can ruin fishing and discourage tourists. But one research group wants to turn this nuisance into pay dirt.

ON THE RV GUNNERUS, TRONDHEIM FJORD:There’s just no polite way to say it: A net full of jellyfish dumped into a big metal vat looks like snot.

Yes, it’s just as quivering and gooey as it looks. But some of these jellyfish also have stinging tentacles. Photo: Nancy Bazilchuk/NTNU

No, that’s not quite right: It looks like the most disgusting combination of snot, vomit, and something you cough out of your lungs that you can possibly imagine.

That doesn’t stop researcher and biologist Nicole Aberle-Malzahn from plunging her hands into this goopy mess to pull out some of the larger, slimier representatives of the species.

Unloved, and mostly thought of as a nuisance, jellyfish are increasingly of interest to both researchers and industry. This is partly due to necessity: there can be so many jellyfish in some areas that they clog the nets of fisherfolk, making it difficult for them to make a living. In Norway, jellyfish can cause major health problems on salmon farms, with huge financial losses. And too many jellyfish in the waters off tourist havens can discourage visitors, with dire economic consequences.

Turn this thinking on its head, though. Jellyfish could also be a valuable resource in and of themselves, either for people to eat or for their gelatinous mantles, which can be used for everything from making cosmetics to sieving microplastic bits from water.

And then, there are the biologists.

“I think they are fascinating,” says Sanna Majaneva, a postdoc at NTNU and at UiT The Arctic University of Norway. “They are an ignored part of the food web. They’re thought of as just being water. And because jellyfish blooms are a natural phenomenon, they have to have an impact on the food web, they have to have a role.”

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(Video) A Day In The Life of a Jellyfish Hunter | NTNU

Sanna Majaneva, a postdoc with a shared position at NTNU and at UiT – the Arctic University of Norway, looks for small jellyfish. Photo: Nancy Bazilchuk/NTNU

Commercializing jellyfish

Aberle-Malzahn, an associate professor at NTNU’s Department of Biology, Majaneva and the half-dozen other researchers on NTNU’s R/V Gunnerus are part of a European-wide project called GoJelly.

The Norwegian-based team is one of 15 scientific institutions from 8 countries involved in the EUR 6 million project, coordinated by the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel in Germany, and funded by the EU’s Horizon 2020 programme.

Article continues under photo.

Each of the larger jellyfish species is weighed, measured and sampled for DNA and other information. From left, Sanna Majaneva, Matias Rekstad, Mari-Ann Østensen. Photo: Nancy Bazilchuk/NTNU

The day’s assignment aboard the Gunnerus is to hunt for adult jellyfish, with the hopes of catching as many as they can scoop up in a net trawled off the back of the research vessel in about 200 metres of water. The ship is roughly a two-hour cruise from Trondheim, on the outer edges of the fjord, where the Gunnerus crew thinks they’ll find their prey.

Paper still has its place on a research cruise. Photo: Nancy Bazilchuk/NTNU

“GoJelly is tackling the challenges we are facing with increasing blooms of jellyfish, not only in European waters, but worldwide,” Aberle-Malzahn said. The project has a clear commercial goal, to develop a filter using the slime from jellyfish that can be used to capture microplastics.

The crew of the RV Gunnerus hauls up a net full of jellyfish from Trondheim Fjord. Photo: Nancy Bazilchuk/NTNU

The researchers also want to better understand what other commercial products might be made from jellyfish. SINTEF Oceans, for example, is looking at what kinds of substances could be extracted from jellyfish for commercial use, from medicine to nutraceuticals to fertilizer. An important part of this task is to learn what causes jellyfish populations to boom.

(Video) Jellyfish Hunter - SpongeBob in real life

Understanding this last factor could help fisherfolk who might be willing to tackle the seemingly unsavoury task of catching jellyfish, either as an off-season occupation or as a full-time job.

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Unloved and poorly understood

Jellyfish are enough of an unloved species that their biology is relatively poorly understood — what exactly do they eat? How much do wind and water currents control their location? And most importantly, what causes their populations to grow explosively in some years and not others, and in some places but not others?

Matias Rekstad, an NTNU master’s student in biology, and Mari-Ann Østensen, senior engineer in the Department of Biology, examine a helmet jelly that looks like a giant heart. Photo: Nancy Bazilchuk/NTNU

“There are more and more blooms, and the sources and origins of these blooms are not quite clear,” Aberle-Malzhan said. “We’re trying to figure what are the factors that enhance growth, and cause jellyfish blooms in the late summer and early autumn. What are the factors that are beneficial for the mass occurrence of blooms — because there is a huge variation and intensity in them.”

That means the GoJelly team will use their time on the Gunnerus to collect all kinds of information to find the answers to these questions.

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Lion’s mane, moon jellies and helmet jellies

Angela Stippkugel, a PhD student in the Department of Biology, collects seawater samples from the CTD sampler on Trondheim Fjord. The sampler allows researchers to take seawater samples at different depths so they can know more about the characteristics of the water throughout the entire water column. Photo: Nancy Bazilchuk/NTNU

The researchers are specifically looking at the lion’s mane jellyfish, Cyanea capillata; moon jellyfish, Aurelia aurita; and the helmet jellyfish, Periphylla periphylla. They are also interested in comb jellies, known by their generic name, ctenophores, but these creatures are not the priority for the day’s cruise

They’ll collect basic information about the seawater where they harvest their jellyfish samples, such as temperature, salinity and nutrients in the water.

This last is an important measure of the amount of nutrients there are in the water for phytoplankton, which are the plankton at the very bottom of the food chain. They’ll also measure something called seston, which gives the researchers an idea of the food quantity and quality that’s available from all the plankton in the water.

But those are just the basics. The cool stuff happens when they drop the long trawl net at their sample site and pull it along the bottom for 20 minutes or so, and then slowly haul it up.

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No big splat, but big gooey bits

Parts of the innermost area of Trondheimfjord can be so full of jellyfish, driven there by winds and waves, that there is concern that jellies could actually displace cod as the top predator in the food chain. But on this day, the Gunnerus is in the very outermost reaches of the fjord, in the last protected arm before the land gives way to the open sea.

(Video) Jellyfish Hunter Deleted Scene

All hands on deck and into the jellyfish vat. Photo: Nancy Bazilchuk/NTNU

That means when the net comes up from the bottom with its jellyfish captives, it won’t be bulging with helmet jellies, Aberle-Malzahn says.

“There won’t be a big splat when we open the net,” she said. “There will be lots of jellies, but the net won’t be completely full.”

Nevertheless, when the green trawl net is hauled aboard, it’s glistening and bulging, and when the Gunnerus crew pulls the cord on the bottom of the net, a big rush of jellyfish-laden water pours out.

Big gloves sometimes a necessity

Much of what tumbles into the metal sorting vat is clear and glistening, made up of comb jellies and moon jellies. Here and there are the triangular-shaped helmet jellyfish, big as a piece of toast. They gleam red in the sun, like oversized cherry-coloured throat lozenges. The few lion’s mane jellies are big, tan and sticky looking, as if they have been coughed up with difficulty by a heavy smoker. Long slimy bits of jellyfish hang off the sides of the net like snot dripping from the nose of a toddler.

A helmet jellyfish, Periphylla periphylla. Photo: Nancy Bazilchuk/NTNU

The crew is undaunted.

They eagerly reach into the vat and start sorting out the jellyfish by species. The lion’s mane jellyfish is the only one that has stinging tentacles with any power, so most of the jellies can be picked out of the vat wearing regular rubber gloves. Only Aberle-Matzahn has elbow-length black gloves, so she is mostly delegated to pluck the stinging jellies out from the gruesome soup.

At one point Matias Einar Rekstad, a master’s student who is studying the life cycle of the moon and lion’s mane jellyfish, decides he’ll try to pick one up anyway.

“Auuugh!” he says, as it slithers out of his hands in a soft, gloppy mess. “I need some bigger gloves to take this one!”

Genetic backtracking

Once the contents of the vat are sorted, the helmet jellyfish and lion’s mane jellyfish are measured and sampled. The samples are for genetic analysis, in part for Majaneva’s piece of the research project. She is studying the population genetics and connections between the different species of adult jellyfish and their younger selves, called polyps.

Sanna Majaneva, a postdoc at NTNU and at UiT – the Arctic University of Norway, ladles moon jellies out of the vat and into waiting hands. Photo: Nancy Bazilchuk/NTNU

(Video) SpongeBob - Jellyfish Hunter (UK Censorship)

“What we would like to know is, what is the origin of the blooms?” she said. “We regularly see blooms of adults, but what is not known is where are the polyp stages, what is the connectivity, how far from their origins do they drift?”

Majaneva and her colleagues have been collecting polyps and adults in different locations, and a computer model for the fjord developed by their Sintef Ocean colleagues should help them understand how currents move the jellyfish around.

“Then we try to put all these factors together to find out the connectivity,” she said. “It’s interesting, because we detect the blooms regularly, and for different species in different locations and at different times of year, but we still don’t know where they are coming from.”

Understanding what causes the jellyfish blooms and where they are likely to form is critical to developing any future harvest of the sea creatures, Majaneva said. For one, if researchers can predict where the blooms are likely to occur, it makes it more economical for fisherfolk to catch them.

“If we do start harvesting them, we have to do it ecologically,” she said. “If we understand what drives the blooms and how they are formed, we can harvest them in a more sustainable way.”

Fascinating species

Not all the research on this cruise has to do with harvesting jellyfish, however. Ellie Johansen, a master’s student in the Department of Biology, is working on a project funded by the Norwegian Biodiversity Information Centre, “GooseAlien: Ctenophores – native aliens in Norwegian waters.” Her supervisors are Majaneva and Aberle-Malzahn.

A small ctenophore or comb jelly, in a petri dish. Photo: Nancy Bazilchuk/NTNU

So while most of the crew is out on the sunny deck, sorting through jellyfish, Johansen is in a lab inside the boat, in the partial dark as she photographs comb jellies through a microscope. These jellyfish are also called sea gooseberries, because of their appearance, or ctenophores, after their Latin name.

She is also collecting DNA from the jellies to create a better database for identifying them, and mapping their occurrence and diversity along the Norwegian coast, partly with the help of local “citizen scientist” divers.

“By careful morphological identification of fresh individuals, collecting DNA and good photographs of the ctenophores I hope to map their poorly understood diversity, and smooth the way for easier future identification” she said.

A moon jelly up close. Photo: Nancy Bazilchuk/NTNU

The comb jellies are especially challenging to study because they are so fragile, and hauling them up out of the depths in a big net bag can crush or destroy the animals. At the same time many of the chemicals used to preserve zooplankton cause distortion and shrinkage of their gelatinous bodies. But Johansen and others on the cruise are eager to learn more about what they see as fascinating creatures.

That was the feeling of Rekstad, whose work with moon and lion’s mane jellyfish involves setting out plates in the ocean to see where jellyfish polyps actually settle so that he can better understand their lifecycle.

(Video) The Scorpion Show: Jellyfish Hunter

“They’re amazing,” he said. “They haven’t really changed in millions of years.”

References:
Halsband, C., Majaneva, S. K., Hosia, A., Emaus, P., Gaardsted, F., Zhou, Q., Nøst, O. A. & Renaud, P. E. (2017). Jellyfish summer distribution, diversity and impact on fish farms in a Nordic fjord. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 591, 267-279.

Rachel Gjelsvik Tiller, Åshild Løvås Borgersen, Øyvind Knutsen, Jennifer Bailey, Hans Vanhauwaert Bjelland, Jarle Mork, Lionel Eisenhauer & Yajie Liu(2017)Coming Soon to a Fjord Near You: Future Jellyfish Scenarios in a Changing Climate,Coastal Management,45:1,1-23,DOI:10.1080/08920753.2017.1237239

FAQs

Do jellyfish hunt humans? ›

Jellyfish sting their prey with their tentacles, releasing a venom that paralyzes their targets. Jellyfish don't go after humans, but someone who swims up against or touches one — or even steps on a dead one — can be stung all the same. While jellyfish stings are painful, most are not emergencies.

How do you hunt jellyfish? ›

Put your hands around the Bell around the head. And then continuing that slow movement lift. It out

What do you do if you get stung by a lion's mane jellyfish? ›

Do
  1. rinse the affected area with seawater (not fresh water)
  2. remove any spines from the skin using tweezers or the edge of a bank card.
  3. soak the area in very warm water (as hot as can be tolerated) for at least 30 minutes – use hot flannels or towels if you cannot soak it.
  4. take painkillers like paracetamol or ibuprofen.

Why are jellyfish important? ›

For scientists, however, jellyfish are fascinating research subjects – they play important roles in the marine ecosystem and are a key source of food for some fish and sea turtles. Some even protect commercially valuable species, such as oysters, from predators.

Does jellyfish have gender? ›

Jellyfish are usually either male or female (with occasional hermaphrodites). In most cases, adults release sperm and eggs into the surrounding water, where the unprotected eggs are fertilized and develop into larvae.

Does human urine help jellyfish stings? ›

Despite what you may have heard, it's a myth that peeing on a jellyfish sting does anything to ease the pain. Not only are there no studies to support this idea, but urine may actually worsen the sting, too. To explain why, let's turn to emergency medicine specialist Thomas Waters, MD.

Are jellyfish good hunters? ›

In fact, in areas where overfishing and habitat destruction have reduced fish populations, jellyfish are now becoming the dominant predators. It turns out that jellyfish, despite their sluggish looks, are just as effective at hunting and catching meals as their competitors with fins.

How do you get a jellyfish spirit? ›

For the easiest way to get Elden Ring Jellyfish Summon, you need to talk to Roderika in the Stormhill Shack location. Once you complete all dialogue options (talk to her 3 times), she will give you this Spirit companion.

Do jellyfish have hearts or brains? ›

Lacking brains, blood, or even hearts, jellyfish are pretty simple critters. They are composed of three layers: an outer layer, called the epidermis; a middle layer made of a thick, elastic, jelly-like substance called mesoglea; and an inner layer, called the gastrodermis.

What jellyfish has the worst sting? ›

The Australian box jellyfish is considered the most venomous marine animal. They may not look dangerous, but the sting from a box jellyfish could be enough to send you to Davy Jones's locker-a watery grave, that is.

How painful is a jellyfish sting? ›

Overview. Jellyfish stings are fairly common problems for people swimming, wading or diving in oceans. The long tentacles trailing from the jellyfish can inject venom from thousands of microscopic barbed stingers. Most often jellyfish stings cause instant pain and inflamed marks on the skin.

Can jellyfish feel pain? ›

Can jellyfish feel pain? Jellyfish don't feel pain in the same way that humans would. They do not possess a brain, heart, bones or a respiratory system. They are 95% water and contain only a basic network of neurons that allow them to sense their environment.

How many hearts does a jellyfish have? ›

They also have no heart, bones or blood and are around 95% water! So how do they function without a brain or central nervous system? They have a basic set of nerves at the base of their tentacles which can detect touch, temperature, salinity etc.

What is a group of jellyfish called? ›

Did you know? A group of jellyfish is called a SMACK! Here are more collective nouns for ocean animals you might not know...

How do jellyfish get pregnant? ›

There are two main ways that jellyfish reproduce and if the conditions are favourable they can do this daily. There are a few jellyfish species that receive sperm through their mouths to fertilise eggs inside the body cavity, but most jellyfish just release sperm or eggs directly into the water.

What kills jellyfish? ›

Jellyfish are eaten by seabirds, turtles, and crabs. Grey triggerfish, ocean sunfish, seabirds, turtles, whale sharks, crabs, and whales eat jellyfish naturally. However, the main predators of jellyfish are usually other different types of jellyfish.

How many babies can a jellyfish have? ›

Some jellyfish can lay as many as 45,000 eggs in a single night.

How long does a jellyfish sting last? ›

Severe pain lasts 1-2 hours. Itch may last for a week. If the skin damage is severe, red or purple lines can last for weeks. General Reactions can occur if there are many stings.

Does vinegar help a jellyfish sting? ›

What should you do if a jellyfish stings you? Scientists have found that applying vinegar is the best solution, and that popular remedies including urine, lemon juice, and shaving foam could make the situation worse.

Why does my jellyfish sting itch? ›

When an itchy rash occurs several days to weeks after a sting, the rash may mean a delayed skin reaction has occurred. A delayed reaction can occur many times over the course of 1 to 2 months following a sting. You may have a fever, weakness, or joint stiffness or swelling.

Why are jellyfish so successful? ›

But when taking into account the crucial element of carbon in their bodies, fish and jellyfish clear the water around them of prey and use the food to produce energy at similar rates. The researchers calculated that the jellies and their competitor fish also have similar potential for growth and reproduction.

Do box jellyfish have brains? ›

The jellyfish don't have a brain to deal with any incoming visual information; they rely instead on a simple ring of nerves to coordinate behaviour.

Why do people fish for jellyfish? ›

Some species of jellyfish are suitable for human consumption and are used as a source of food and as an ingredient in various dishes. Edible jellyfish is a seafood that is harvested and consumed in several East and Southeast Asian countries, and in some Asian countries it is considered to be a delicacy.

How do you summon jellyfish? ›

WHERE TO FIND THE SPIRIT JELLYFISH ASHES IN ELDEN RING

What's the best summons in Elden Ring? ›

In our view, the Mimic Tear Spirit Summon is the best one available in Elden Ring, even after the recent nerf it got in Patch 1.03. This unique Spirit Summon creates an exact copy of your character when you use it, including your stats, armor, weapons, spells, and equipped consumables.

Where are the jellyfish ashes? ›

Spirit Jellyfish Ashes Location in Elden Ring

Limgrave: In Stormhill Shack there's a woman with a red hood named Roderika that will give you x1 Spirit Jellyfish Ashes by talking to her several times.

Do jellyfish know they are alive? ›

Jellyfish sting for the same reason many sharks bite, they bump into something they think might be food and try and eat it. Are jellyfish conscious? Jellyfish have no brains and therefore are not aware of their own existence. So no, while alive they are not “conscious”.

How does a jellyfish poop? ›

It's a lot like what happens in our own tummies after a meal. Any waste – that's poop – then comes back through the mouth. That's because jellyfish only have one opening into their stomach, so waste comes out the same opening as food goes in.

What jellyfish can live forever? ›

The hydrozoan Turritopsis dohrnii, an animal about 4.5 millimetres wide and tall (likely making it smaller than the nail on your little finger), can actually reverse its life cycle. It has been dubbed the immortal jellyfish.

How many people have died from jellyfish? ›

It is important to note that not all box jellyfish encounters are deadly. However, approximately 100 people die each year from stings by the deadliest jellyfish.

Are jellyfish edible? ›

You can eat jellyfish in many ways, including shredded or sliced thinly and tossed with sugar, soy sauce, oil, and vinegar for a salad. It can also be cut into noodles, boiled, and served mixed with vegetables or meat. Prepared jellyfish has a delicate flavor and surprisingly crunchy texture.

Can you survive a box jellyfish? ›

If you suspect a box jellyfish sting, call 911 immediately. Most box jellyfish stings are not deadly, but they can be fatal or cause severe distress. If the person is not breathing, administer cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) if possible until emergency medical personnel arrive.

Do rash guards protect from jellyfish? ›

For surfers, snorkelers, and scuba divers who opt not to wear a wetsuit, the rash guard will offer adequate protection from waterborne irritants and jellyfish stings.

What does a jellyfish bite look like? ›

You may see red, brown, or purple track marks on the skin. Along with the marks, you may feel: Burning, prickling, or stinging. Itching.

Does urine attract jellyfish? ›

Urine can actually aggravate the jellyfish's stingers into releasing more venom. This cure is, indeed, fiction. Jellyfish, those bulbous Medusa-like creatures, float near many of the world's beaches.

Does a jellyfish sleep? ›

New research finds that jellyfish enter a sleep-like state. If the study, published today (Sept. 21) in the journal Current Biology, is confirmed by future studies, jellyfish are the first-ever animals with no central nervous system to have been observed sleeping.

Can you touch the top of a jellyfish? ›

The long tentacles of the jellyfish are what produce the sting. You can touch the top of the jellyfish without being hurt.

Are jellyfish asexual? ›

Throughout their lifecycle, jellyfish take on two different body forms: medusa and polyps. Polyps can reproduce asexually by budding, while medusae spawn eggs and sperm to reproduce sexually.

What happens if you cut a jellyfish in half? ›

If you cut a jellyfish in half, the pieces of the jellyfish can regenerate and turn into two new jellies.

Is there a jellyfish Emoji? ›

Jellyfish was approved as part of Unicode 15.0 in 2022 and added to Emoji 15.0 in 2022.

How old do jellyfish live? ›

On average, jellyfish will live anywhere from 1-3 years. However, certain species will only live a few days while others are able to live for a few decades. However, scientists are unable to say definitively how long jellyfish live due to their complex life cycles.

Can jellyfish hear? ›

Animal Jam - Ask Tierney: Can jellyfish see or hear? - YouTube

How long can jellyfish survive out of water? ›

After a while and looking at my watch's timer, I blurted out to the group: “48 minutes.” Now we learned that jellyfishes could survive that long out of sea water.

What's a baby jellyfish called? ›

Each polyp will bud off many baby jellyfish called ephyrae that grow very quickly into adult medusae.

What is a group of humans called? ›

Take, for example, the word 'crowd'. It could be used to describe a group of young kids, as well as people of other ages. Similarly, 'mob' can also be used to describe a group of humans.

What is a shiver of sharks? ›

A Shiver of Sharks

One of our favourite collective nouns on the list is the name for a group of sharks – a 'shiver'. We think it could be suggestive of what happens to a person who stumbles across a group of sharks while out swimming. Or it could relate to the fact that most sharks are cold-blooded.

What do jellyfish do to humans? ›

The long tentacles trailing from the jellyfish can inject venom from thousands of microscopic barbed stingers. Most often jellyfish stings cause instant pain and inflamed marks on the skin. Some stings may cause more whole-body (systemic) illness. And in rare cases they're life-threatening.

Can jellyfish feel pain? ›

Can jellyfish feel pain? Jellyfish don't feel pain in the same way that humans would. They do not possess a brain, heart, bones or a respiratory system. They are 95% water and contain only a basic network of neurons that allow them to sense their environment.

Do jellyfish know they are alive? ›

Jellyfish sting for the same reason many sharks bite, they bump into something they think might be food and try and eat it. Are jellyfish conscious? Jellyfish have no brains and therefore are not aware of their own existence. So no, while alive they are not “conscious”.

What cures a jellyfish sting? ›

Most jellyfish stings can be treated as follows:
  1. Carefully pluck visible tentacles with a fine tweezers.
  2. Soak the skin in hot water. Use water that's 110 to 113 F (43 to 45 C). It should feel hot, not scalding. ...
  3. Apply 0.5% to 1% hydrocortisone cream or ointment twice a day to the affected skin.
6 Aug 2022

What is the deadliest jellyfish? ›

The Australian box jellyfish is considered the most venomous marine animal. They may not look dangerous, but the sting from a box jellyfish could be enough to send you to Davy Jones's locker-a watery grave, that is.

How long after death can a jellyfish sting? ›

The real answer, it seems, is not “Two weeks”, but however long it takes for the stingers to run out of sting. Jellyfish are not active stingers. Whether the animal is alive or dead means nothing to its nematocysts (the little cells in the tentacles in charge of stinging you).

Are jellyfish asexual? ›

Throughout their lifecycle, jellyfish take on two different body forms: medusa and polyps. Polyps can reproduce asexually by budding, while medusae spawn eggs and sperm to reproduce sexually.

What happens if you cut a jellyfish in half? ›

If you cut a jellyfish in half, the pieces of the jellyfish can regenerate and turn into two new jellies.

What is a school of jellyfish called? ›

Did you know? A group of jellyfish is called a SMACK! Here are more collective nouns for ocean animals you might not know...

How many hearts does a jellyfish have? ›

They also have no heart, bones or blood and are around 95% water! So how do they function without a brain or central nervous system? They have a basic set of nerves at the base of their tentacles which can detect touch, temperature, salinity etc.

How does a jellyfish poop? ›

It's a lot like what happens in our own tummies after a meal. Any waste – that's poop – then comes back through the mouth. That's because jellyfish only have one opening into their stomach, so waste comes out the same opening as food goes in.

Does urine attract jellyfish? ›

Urine can actually aggravate the jellyfish's stingers into releasing more venom. This cure is, indeed, fiction. Jellyfish, those bulbous Medusa-like creatures, float near many of the world's beaches.

How intelligent is a jellyfish? ›

Jellyfish are not very smart. “They have very simple sensory organs, and no brain to process any information,” says marine biologist Stein Kaartvedt.

Is there a jellyfish that never dies? ›

The hydrozoan Turritopsis dohrnii, an animal about 4.5 millimetres wide and tall (likely making it smaller than the nail on your little finger), can actually reverse its life cycle. It has been dubbed the immortal jellyfish.

How old do jellyfish live? ›

On average, jellyfish will live anywhere from 1-3 years. However, certain species will only live a few days while others are able to live for a few decades. However, scientists are unable to say definitively how long jellyfish live due to their complex life cycles.

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